SEI February Newsletter

The Scottish Episcopal Institute, which is responsible for training priests, deacons and lay readers in our Church, produces a monthly newsletter.  If you are interested in what the Institute and its students (including our own Don Grant) are doing, you can read about it here: SEI Newsletter February 2018.

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SEI January Newsletter

The Scottish Episcopal Institute, which is responsible for training priests, deacons and lay readers in our Church, produces a monthly newsletter.  If you are interested in what the Institute and its students (including our own Don Grant – pictured above) are doing, you can read about it here SEI Newsletter January 2018.

In his masters steps …

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Two dozen hardy souls braved the elements, “thou the snow lay round about deep and crisp and even” to Kai and Mike’s traditional readings and carols at the Crask on Thursday (even if a couple of days late for the Feast of Stephen).

We sat around a furnace of a stove, sang, listened and of course shared in Kai and Mike’s legendary hospitality – scones, mince pies, tea, coffee and all the rest.  Thanks to everyone,  it was truly wonderful.

A lovely gentle service at the Crask

The December Crask service attracted a sizeable congregation including several people who had not been before.  We reflected on the journey towards Christmas which starts at the Annunciation (March 25th) and culminates in the Word becoming Flesh in a manger in Bethlehem.

Don’t forget the traditional Carols at the Crask service and fellowship next Thursday (December 28th) starting at 2pm.

Have a blessed Christmas.

SEI December Newsletter

The Scottish Episcopal Institute, which is responsible for training priests, deacons and lay readers in our Church, now produces a monthly newsletter.  If you are interested in what the Institute and its students (including our own Don Grant) are doing, you can read about it here SEI December Newsletter.

and the food rolled in

Just a small selection …

Yesterday saw a very successful Special Collection for the Food Bank which St Finnbarr’s held in the Dornoch Social Club.  There was a steady stream of contributors, most of whom stopped for coffee/tea and a chat.

A huge thank you to those who contributed and to Marian and the other members of the congregation who worked so hard throughout the morning.  Margaret and Alan’s car will be much relieved when it’s all over and it’s suspension can return to normal:-)

Caithness and Sutherland Women’s Aid

Recently at the invitation of St Finnbarr’s, Dornoch, a small group of women gathered in the Dornoch Social Club to learn about the work of Caithness and Sutherland Women’s Aid (CASWA) which St Finnbarrs Charity Shop has supported with donations for several years. Those present were from the congregation of St Finnbarrs, volunteers from the Charity Shop, members of the Dornoch and District Community Association (DADCA) coffee group and some members of the Dornoch Cathedral Guild.

In an informal and interactive talk, the two speakers Carol an adult support worker and Jackie a child support worker, gave the group an idea of the different forms of abuse which women suffer, how children in a family can be affected and how CASWA supports them.

The physical nature of abuse is probably fairly well known but the speakers emphasised the insidious mental abuse to which many of the women who come to them are subjected. The coercive, dominating and controlling behaviour exerted by partners undermines women and leads to loss of confidence and self-esteem. The increasing role of social media in this kind of abuse was highlighted. Just one example of several we were given was that some women are tracked by their partners mobile phones when they are out of the house. Social media abuse is also a growing problem among young women still at school.

The work of CASWA is confidential and support workers are non-judgemental. Their role is to offer emotional and practical to help to abuse sufferers, to help them decide what to do, not tell them what to do. They then support them and any children involved in following through with their decisions. Although CASWA can no longer fund a safe house for abused women and children they have access to a national data base of organisations and authorities that can provide safe accommodation. If women and any children they may have are at immediate risk of harm they are therefore able to make referrals if necessary.

CASWA is responding to increasing numbers of requests for help. This reflects national trends. In 2016 -2017 there were 58,810 domestic abuse incidents reported to police in Scotland and there are certainly many more which were not reported.

CASWA can be contacted on:

Tel 0345 408 0151 (24 hour answer service)
National Domestic Abuse Helpline 0800 027 1234 (24 hours)
Office hours 9am – 5pm Monday – Friday

or by Email at: info@caswa.org.uk